Posts tagged Growth mindset
7 Proven Ingredients for Building Resilience
 
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Resilience - the ability to adapt and bounce back.

 

Today’s business world is constantly changing, more so than ever before. From markets to work environments, leaders now need to plan for both the expected and the unexpected. Resilience is playing an increasingly important role in a company’s ability to adapt to change and overcome the challenges associated with it.

 

We all know that no business, individual or team is perfect. There will always be challenges, tension and failure, no matter what role or business you’re in. In order to not only survive but to thrive you need to be resilient.

 

Building resilience is easy for situations where we have control, but it is far more challenging in situations where we are not in control.

 

Here are seven proven ingredients for building resilience:

 

Connectedness 

Teams with strong relationships underpinned with trust and understanding always outperform those without. This is particularly true for teams facing obstacles.

 

Engagement

Connectedness leads to greater employee engagement. Engaged employees are more likely to bounce back from setbacks because they’re more invested and want to see your company succeed. They are also more likely to tackle challenges.

 

Review

Resilience is more than simply moving on. It involves reflection and review. Resilient teams ask questions such as ‘What worked and what didn’t work?, How can we do better next time?, What have we learned?’.

 

Future Focus

Maintaining a positive outlook towards the future is a crucial component of resilience. While learning from the past is important, dwelling on it is not. A leader’s mood has a huge impact on the mood of the team. It is easy to be positive and confident when things are going well. However, optimism has a greater impact in the face of problems. A great leader should maintain their optimism despite how they may be feeling.

 

Recognition & Growth

The majority of employees feel that their importance to an organisation is the main source of their commitment to a company. Recognising employees for their accomplishments is a great way to foster a culture of recognition, growth and resilience.

 

Vulnerability 

Consistently demonstrating personal control and resolve is a well known leadership trait, however it is vulnerability that is most powerful in building team resilience. When a leader role models vulnerability and resolve in the face of vulnerability, they make it ok for their team to do the same and helps boost team resilience.

 

Identify Difficult People 

Within each team in various situations there may be employees who are more difficult or who are bringing down the overall morale among team members. The negativity of even just one employee can have an impact on the overall resilience of a team. Good leadership and a healthy company culture means identifying these people early on and intervening. Addressing the underlying issues that individual team members are experiencing can boost their morale and in turn the resilience of the team.

 

 

Taking the steps to build resilience will put your team in a strong position when faced with inevitable challenges. Building resilience is something that all organisations need to plan for before the difficult times hit. Be ready so your people and organisation will reap the rewards.


 
Nine Ways to Overcome Anxiety & Avoidance
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Anxiety can lead to avoidance and what we commonly refer to as procrastination. This creates a catch 22 as avoidance creates stress and increases anxiety about whatever it is we may be avoiding.

When we feel overwhelmed we often procrastinate. We all have things we feel overwhelmed by whether it’s one big task or a series of small tasks that are piling up like a mountain. Sometimes willpower alone is not enough to motivate us to tackle what we have been avoiding. Anxiety and a pattern of avoidance can cause procrastination to get out of hand. Therefore, it is wise to develop a set of strategies to help you break through procrastination and avoidance.

Here are 9 strategies for overcoming anxiety, avoidance and procrastination:


1. Sort Tasks by Project Rather than Days

Save the space on your daily to-do list for things you truly need to do that day. Over cluttering your daily to-do lists can make you feel as though you are constantly falling behind as you run out of time and continue to have to bump tasks to the next day. Instead try creating a list of tasks around each project and outline all the actions you need to take so that you can tackle them when you have time.

2. Check Your Expectations

Sometimes we overestimate how much we can get done in a single day. When our expectations of ourselves are not in line with what we can actually accomplish it can lead to stress, anxiety, lower confidence levels and ultimately procrastination and avoidance.

A great way to assess what you can actually get done in a day is to see how much you manage to get through on your daily to-do list during an average week. By looking at what you have actually done rather than what you need to do you can create more realistic expectations for yourself in the future.

3. Watch Out for All-or-Nothing Thinking

All-or-Nothing thinking is very common among people who experience anxiety.  For example, if you need to reply to a couple dozen emails the task seems much bigger if you think you need to tackle all of them at once. Instead, just look at them as individual replies rather than something you have to do all at once.

4. Identify Tasks Where You Have Predicted a Negative Outcome

Sometimes we avoid doing something or seeking feedback because we fear getting negative information. If we do not feel confident that we can cope with negative outcomes we are more likely to avoid facing reality. Half of the battle is identifying that you are making negative predictions. Once you have, a good way to overcome this is to recognise that the outcome may not be negative, or that if it is you will be able to cope. It is a good exercise to think about how you will cope with any negative emotions associated with a task, such as dealing with debt. When you plan on how you will manage your feelings around a task it will make it a lot easier to take the steps you need to in order to get it done.

5. Adopt a Growth Mindset

Having a fixed mindset can lead to avoidance coping and a growth mindset can overcome it. Fixed mindsets affect our confidence and competence when approaching a task leading to thoughts such as ‘I can’t do this’ or ‘I am not good at giving speeches’. A growth mindset can help us overcome anxiety and avoidance by increasing our confidence that we can learn new skill sets and improve on existing ones. Learn more about Growth vs. Fixed Mindsets.

6. Seek Support

Sometimes we experience anxiety and avoidance because a task is actually too much work or requires too much knowledge to tackle on our own.These difficulties are common for new tasks where the path is less clear. Sometimes we need help or advice on the best way to approach a task. Allow others to help you with difficult tasks.

7. Learn to Tolerate Uncertainty

Uncertainty can cause a lot of anxiety that ultimately manifests itself as avoidance. This is commonly referred to as feeling stuck or not knowing where to start. In many instances we spend a lot of time working through different scenarios rather than taking the first step. Learning to tolerate and accept uncertainty can help get us moving on a task.  

8. Clear Obstacles

If you have been avoiding a task for a long time and it is particularly important, such as choosing health insurance or filing a tax return, try setting aside an entire day dedicated to the task. While you may not need an entire day to get the task done, clearing your to-do list so there are no other options for procrastination can help you focus and tackle the tasks you have been putting off.

9. Reward Yourself

Some tasks are not enjoyable or have negative feelings associated with them, leading to greater anxiety and avoidance. Sometimes rewarding yourself for doing a task can make it easier to begin the process of knocking it off of your to-do list.

10 Habits of High Performers
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When we look at successful people we often think they are lucky, when in reality success is almost certainly the result of hours of work, sacrifices and learning from when things haven’t gone to plan. Although each person has their own individual path to creating successful outcomes there are several habits that are common among high achievers.

Here are some of the top habits of high performers:

1. Embracing the Morning

The easiest way to let the day slip away from you is to sleep through it. By having a healthy morning routine high performers set the tone for the day. It is far easier to optimise your time when you wake up at the same time each day and have a consistent routine. Ensure your morning routine sets your mind and body up for success.

2. Learning From Failure

Everyone fails, even high performers. However, high performers make a point of learning from failure and seeing it as an opportunity to improve. When you fail you can determine what to do in order to succeed next time.

3. Acting from a Place of Purpose

In addition to determining what we want to do we need to find the reasons why. High performers have a sense of purpose that guides their actions and decisions. Acting from a place of purpose makes our work and sacrifices more meaningful and can help us stay motivated.

4. Developing Patience

Overnight successes typically come after years of hard work. In order to become a high performer you must be patient with yourself and focus on the steps along the road to achieving the results you desire.

5. Self-Care

Performing at a high level requires a great deal of energy. In order to generate this energy high performers understand that they must take care of their mental and physical stamina. If we are too fatigued and not properly nourished it is difficult to maintain focus.

6. Task Prioritisation

Everyone has the same 24 hours in each day. In order to be productive high performers prioritise the activities that will have the greatest impact. Sometimes this means learning to say no to opportunities that are not related to your end goals.

7. Minimising Distractions

Staying focused takes a lot of discipline. Sometimes success means staying at the office and working on a beautiful sunny day. While this is not enjoyable, high performers understand the importance of getting things done and saying no to distractions.

8. Seeking Knowledge

Successful people tend to be lifelong learners who seek out new information and feedback that can guide them along their way. They read books, listen to podcasts and invest in conferences to continually extend their knowledge.

9. Choosing Positive People

Negative people have no place in a high performer’s social circle. It is crucial to surround yourself with people who have a similar outlook and are supportive. Friends that drain your energy or distract you can hinder your ability to achieve your goals.

10. Maintaining a Positive Attitude

High performers generally adopt a proactive, positive approach to everything they do. Positivity is a much better motivator than fear of failure, as fear is more likely to create inhibitions that stand in the way of your achievements.


Each individual defines success differently. It is important to define what success means and looks like for you and to determine what steps you need to take in order to get there.

Action: write down what success means to you and determine three things that you can change today in order to get you one step closer to success.





Growth Mindset vs Fixed Mindset

The mind is a powerful thing. Sometimes the biggest obstacle to our success is our own thinking. Our mindset can limit us or set us free. No one understands this quite like Carol Dweck, a Stanford University researcher best known for her work on fixed and growth mindsets and her groundbreaking book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. At Mind Strength, we work a lot with our clients to help them develop a growth mindset.

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The Difference Between a Growth Mindset and a Fixed Mindset

Dweck describes the difference between a fixed mindset vs. growth mind as the following:

‘In a fixed mindset (individuals) believe their basic abilities, their intelligence, their talents, are just fixed traits. They have a certain amount and that's that, and then their goal becomes to look smart all the time and never look dumb. In a growth mindset (individuals) understand that their talents and abilities can be developed through effort, good teaching and persistence. They don't necessarily think everyone's the same or anyone can be Einstein, but they believe everyone can get smarter if they work at it.’

A growth mindset is advantageous when making your way through life. Someone with a growth mindset will not hesitate to try again where they once failed. Failures are perceived as temporary setbacks rather than permanent limits. Rather than striving for approval from others those with a growth mindset develop a passion for lifelong learning. As a result, those with a growth mindset are more likely to maximise their potential.

Transitioning to a Growth Mindset

One of the hardest parts of changing your mindset is identifying what your current mindset is. Sometimes we sabotage our own potential without even realising it. Some of our longstanding beliefs about ourselves, such as ‘I am not athletic’ or ‘I am not good with technology’, may have their roots in our childhood and be holding us back as adults. Not only does this prevent us from learning new skills in the short-term, but in the long-term.

Here are seven tips for approaching life with a growth mindset:

1. Focus on the process rather than the result

When embarking on learning anything new it can seem like we have so much ground to cover that it is intimidating. Rather than focusing on the end result break it up into a series of smaller goals to achieve along the way. Focus on learning new things well rather than quickly.

2. View challenges as opportunities

Whenever we begin to learn anything new there are bound to be challenges. Facing these challenges and framing them as opportunities is vital when taking on a growth mindset. Our fear of facing new challenges is most often rooted in our fear of failure. As much as we may want to change it feels safer to continue down our usual path, make excuses and remain in our comfort zones. Overcoming this internal resistance is essential to personal growth and success.

3. Stop seeking approval from others

Your goal when learning new things should be to better yourself for your own benefit without worrying what other people may think.

4. Acknowledge your weaknesses

Even the most successful people on the planet have weaknesses. By acknowledging and embracing our weaknesses we give ourselves the opportunity to improve on them and set more realistic goals.

5. Take criticism constructively

While criticism is often viewed negatively it is often one of our best sources of feedback. Being made aware of our faults allows us to take note and improve. When you take on a growth mindset you will not take criticism as personally.

6. Take time to reflect

Don’t forget to look back on what you have learned and acknowledge your own progress. A journal is a great way to record your thoughts and reflect on what you have accomplished.

7. View learning as a lifelong journey

You will always be learning no matter how old or successful you become. Once you have accomplished one goal you should be prepared to start on another.

 

Developing a growth mindset requires a commitment to changing your beliefs about your own talents and abilities and making room for continuous growth. A growth mindset will enable you to stay motivated by looking at the big picture behind your choices and be less easily discouraged.